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Our nearest star #summerinthecity #sunset #flushing #uhaul #laguardia  (at World Financial Group - Prince Center, Flushing)

Our nearest star #summerinthecity #sunset #flushing #uhaul #laguardia (at World Financial Group - Prince Center, Flushing)

#Indonesian#Diaspora#USA#indofest #flipagram made with @flipagram ♫ Music: Florida Georgia Line - This Is How We Roll (feat. Luke Bryan) (at Sheraton Canal St New Orleans)

pubhealth:

Chronic disease overlap cuts life expectancy
Stephanie Desmon-JHU
Struggling with multiple chronic illnesses shortens life expectancy dramatically, and for older Americans, it threatens to reverse recent gains in average lifespans.
Nearly four in five older Americans now live with multiple chronic medical conditions, which perhaps could explain why increases in life expectancy for US seniors are already slowing, report researchers.
“Living with multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes, kidney disease, and heart failure is now the norm and not the exception in the United States,” says lead author Eva H. DuGoff, a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.
“The medical advances that have allowed sick people to live longer may not be able to keep up with the growing burden of chronic disease. It is becoming very clear that preventing the development of additional chronic conditions in the elderly could be the only way to continue to improve life expectancy.”
Life expectancy in the US is rising more slowly than in other parts of the developed world. Many blame the obesity epidemic and related health conditions for the worsening health of the American population.
More…
(From Futurity.org - Source: Johns Hopkins University)

pubhealth:

Chronic disease overlap cuts life expectancy

Struggling with multiple chronic illnesses shortens life expectancy dramatically, and for older Americans, it threatens to reverse recent gains in average lifespans.

Nearly four in five older Americans now live with multiple chronic medical conditions, which perhaps could explain why increases in life expectancy for US seniors are already slowing, report researchers.

“Living with multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes, kidney disease, and heart failure is now the norm and not the exception in the United States,” says lead author Eva H. DuGoff, a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“The medical advances that have allowed sick people to live longer may not be able to keep up with the growing burden of chronic disease. It is becoming very clear that preventing the development of additional chronic conditions in the elderly could be the only way to continue to improve life expectancy.”

Life expectancy in the US is rising more slowly than in other parts of the developed world. Many blame the obesity epidemic and related health conditions for the worsening health of the American population.

More…

(From Futurity.org - Source: Johns Hopkins University)

whitehouse:

“Forty-five years ago, while the world watched as one, the United States of America set foot on the moon. It was a seminal moment not just in our country’s history, but the history of all humankind.” —President Obama on meeting with the Apollo 11 crew and their families to mark the 45th anniversary of the first lunar landing.

todaysdocument:

Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin make the first moonwalk, on July 20, 1969.

In these clips they can been seen planting the U.S. Flag on the lunar surface and experimenting with various types of movement in the Moon’s lower gravity, including loping strides and kangaroo hops.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon

Happy 4th of July 🗽🎆🇺🇸 – View on Path.

Happy 4th of July 🗽🎆🇺🇸 – View on Path.